Monday, January 30, 2012

Monday Morning Coffee- January 30 2012

Aaawwwwwppphhh!!!  Yaawwwwn, stretch, scratch, repeat.  Monday again?

Weeeeeelll, Monday comes at us like a county plow truck.  What's on your agenda this week?  I'm still looking for work and have to press on with that.  Know anyone who needs a good writer or a good painter? Hey, I'm good at most everything I do, just put me to work.

Not much to report in the way of fishing.  I've been oddly detached from fly tying.  I missed a couple of great opportunities to get out on the river which is a shame.  We had at least one 40 degree day and heavy rain to start the week, which should have brought in some steelhead.  There's always this week, right?  It's -1 here this morning, but supposed to get back up to 40 degrees tomorrow.

I wrote a piece Thursday night about tolerance on the river after reading Troutrageous!' post about Lefty Kreh's comments on Tenkara.  I should clarify that I have no beef with Lefty Kreh or anyone else, but only was citing examples of things I hear throughout the fly fishing world that make me cringe at times.  If anything I blame Daniel Galhardo (Mr. Tenkara USA) for promoting Tenkara as "pure".  Mr. Galhardo has a product to sell, and he's taken the unfortunate route of promoting it as Zen Buddhism on the river to move rods and gear off the shelf.  It's a recipe for blow-back to be sure.  Lefty Kreh, who has been guiding all his life and is up to his bushy eyebrows in the nitty-gritty of fly fisherania probably knows a thing or two about what comes and goes.  Dan Galhardo's rhetoric about Tenkara makes me snarky and dismissive, but when guys I know and respect like Cameron Mortenson, Mike Agneta and Tom Sadler say that tenkara is awesome, I sit up and pay attention.  My take on Tenkara itself is that I'd like to try it.  It sounds like a great diversion.  I won't break my other rods over my knee, but if I like it I'll add it to the mix.  What I don't like in the world of fly fishing is an aura of sanctimony, superiority, or "purism".  In another post by Troutrageous! last week, he referenced an article by Yvonne Chouinard, founder of Patagonia, and a legend in the outdoor world- as a mountain climber, fly angler and all-around outdoorsman.  In it, Mr. Chouinard refers to "the dying fly fishing industry".  Coming from a man whose company sells fly gear, I'd think he would know what he's talking about- all he has to do is look at his bottom line year after year.  My point was that if we as fly anglers fracture into smaller and smaller splinter groups at odds with each other, the death of the sport is inevitable.  If we embrace one another and unite to promote our sport as a fun and healthy activity, regardless of how we choose to pursue it, then it may thrive and even grow.

Okay, I haven't shared any Blog Love (Troutrageous pat. pend.) in a while, so let me share a recent favorite.  I've been enjoying reading The Flying Kayak over the last few months.  Alex combines a love of fly fishing and bow hunting and kayaking in southern Florida.  He shares a wide variety of adventures in a fresh and casual style with solid photography.  I guess what I like about his blog is that it takes me away from my everyday world to a completely different environment and species I'm unfamiliar with.  He hunts deer in the thick swamps, catches pompano on the beaches, and fishes for tarpon from a kayak in the Everglades.  If you're looking for fly fishing adventures different from the usual salmonid fare, check his blog out at  theflyingkayak.blogspot.com.




Well, it's going to be a busy week.  I'll try to get a couple of posts done including the January installment of my "Angler's Year" series.  Let's get after it.

12 comments:

  1. Thanks. You get my appreciation for posting early in the day, first day of the week. By the way, John Geirach has weighed in as someone who likes Tenkara, and I respect his ideas. Now, onward. Flies to tie. Boxes to organize. Don't think I can add fishing to the list for another month.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's too cold to go right now anyway. Enjoy your tying and thanks for commenting.

      Delete
  2. Welcome to Monday...looks like a long week of technology for me, but hopefully can find an hour or two on the river. I'm like you, will want to try Tenkara, and will probably enjoy it in some applications, but I m not going out and snapping the other rods over my knee.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you get out there. We have some warm weather this week so who knows.

      Delete
  3. Well, just when I thought the subject was dead. Good luck on the job search and think about writing a children's fly fishing book or a blog by a snarky brown trout.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Ah, you know- I write a post in the heat of the moment then feel I have to go back and clarify. Those two categories may be taken, though a book about a brook trout's struggle to survive may get some traction.

    ReplyDelete
  5. "Mr. Galhardo has a product to sell, and he's taken the unfortunate route of promoting it as Zen Buddhism on the river to move rods and gear off the shelf."

    Are you reading what Daniel Galhardo writes or what other people say he writes. Big difference. Actually, he scoffs at the Zen references. He promotes tenkara as a simple way to fly fish, no more, no less.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought I had my references straight. Maybe I took the videos the wrong way. My real point has less to do with Tenkara than with all various cliques in fly fishing. It's just a recent example of feuding about nothing which diminishes rather than promotes the sport.

      Delete
  6. Thanks for the blog love! Really means a lot!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Keep up the quality posts. I've spent evenings poking through your archives. I love the saltwater stuff.

      Delete
  7. Couldn't agree more with your perspective on the tenkara debate. I don't know much about Daniel, but my first impressions are very similar to yours. He's promoting and selling a product. I also haven't been drawn in enough to jump on the bandwagon. I don't think it really suits my preferred methods for fishing. I think there is no denying it has its place and purpose, but I don't think it can ever replace all your standard fly gear.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you get a hot salmon or steelhead on, you had better be prepared to run. Big pike and muskie, same scenario. And let's face it, at some times your going to want to cast 50 or more feet and be proud of it.

      Delete